BN: Basic Nursing, 1923-1933

MN: Post-Baccalaureate Nursing, 1934-1958

MSN: Clinical Nurse Specialists, Nurse Practitioners, and Nurse-Midwives, 1956 to present

DNSc: Doctor of Nursing Science Program, 1994 to present

Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

Historical Library

Bibliography of
Secondary Sources
on the History of
Yale Medical School

 

The Yale School of Nursing: A Yale Tercentennial Exhibit

 

MSN: Clinical Nurse Specialists, Nurse Practitioners, and Nurse-Midwives, 1956 to present.

 

On January 22, 1956 Yale University President A. Whitney Griswold announced a new program leading to the Master of Science in Nursing degree.

1958 marked the start of research activities at Yale School of Nursing. Margaret G. Arnstein was the first Visiting Professor on Annie W. Goodrich Endowment. Distinguished faculty members noted for their research have included: Ida Jean Orlando (1954-1961), Ernestine Wiedenbach (1952-1966), Virginia Henderson (1953-1971), James Dickoff (1962-1968), Patricia James (1962-1968), Lucy Conant (1957-1968), and Florence Wald (1957-1968), and later Rhetaugh Dumas (1961-1974) and Donna Diers (1964-present).

In 1971 and 1972 two new tracks were added to the MSN program: Pediatric Nurse Practitioner within the Pediatric Nursing program, and the Family Nurse Practitioner within the Public Health Nursing program.

 

Yale School of Nursing Building at 855 Howard Avenue, 1977-1990

The School of Nursing had long desired a building of its own. During the 1940s enrollment peaked and the students needed more adequate housing. By the 1960s the need for space for faculty, administrative offices, and classrooms had become critical. By 1970 the School moved to St. John's School at 38 South Street. The renovation was completed in June 1977 and the dedication was held on June 4, 1977. The renovated space included a new entrance and the address changed to 855 Howard Avenue.

 

Florence Schorske Wald, Fourth Dean of Yale School of Nursing, 1959-1967

Florence Schorske Wald was born in New York City in 1917. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Mt. Holyoke College in 1938, a Master of Nursing degree from Yale University in 1941, and a Master of Science degree from Yale University in 1956. She was awarded an honorary Doctor of Law degree from the University of Bridgeport in 1967, an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Mt. Holyoke College in 1978, and an honorary Doctor of Medical Sciences from Yale University in 1995. Wald joined the faculty of Yale School of Nursing as assistant professor of psychiatric nursing in 1957, became acting dean in 1958, and was appointed the fourth dean of the Yale School of Nursing in 1959. After stepping down as dean in 1967, Wald continued to serve on the faculty of the School of Nursing. A pioneer of the hospice movement in the United States and founder of Hospice Care in America, she is a board member of Hospice in Branford.

 

Margaret Gene Arnstein, Fifth Dean of Yale School of Nursing, 1967-1972

Margaret Gene Arnstein was born in New York City in 1904. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Smith College in 1925, a nursing diploma from Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing in New York City in 1928, a Master of Arts degree in Public Health Nursing from Teachers College, Columbia University in 1929, and a Master of Public Health from The Johns Hopkins University in 1934. She was the recipient of honorary Doctor of Science degrees from Smith College in 1950, from Wayne State University in 1962, and from the University of Michigan in 1972. Before becoming dean of the Yale School of Nursing in 1967, Arnstein served in a number of public health positions, including director and chief of the Division of Nursing at the United States Public Health Service. She influenced public health nursing, nursing education, and the application of systematic research in nursing and health care. Arnstein died in 1972.

 

Virginia Avenel Henderson (1897-1996)

Virginia Henderson, called the "first lady of nursing" and the "first truly international nurse", was an outstanding teacher. She received honorary degrees from thirteen universities and was a member of the American Nursing Association Hall of Fame. Virginia A. Henderson held the position of Research Associate from 1953 to 1971 and Research Associate Emeritus from 1971 to 1996 at the Yale School of Nursing. Her publications include the revision of Bertha Harmer's Textbook of the Principles and Practice of Nursing, Nursing Research, A Survey and Assessment, in collaboration with Leo Simonds, and The Nursing Studies Index. The Nature of Nursing, published in 1966, synthesizes her beliefs about the essence of nursing as a profession.

 

MSN thesis, 1958

The MSN degree required for, the first time, a nursing thesis. Shown is one of the earliest theses.

 

Donna Kaye Diers, Sixth Dean of Yale School of Nursing, 1972-1984
First Annie W. Goodrich Professor of Nursing

Donna Kaye Diers was born in Sheridan, Wyoming. She received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Denver in 1960 and her Master of Science in Nursing from Yale University in 1964. She served on the faculty of the Yale School of Nursing in a variety of positions before becoming its sixth dean in 1972. After stepping down as dean, she continued to serve on the faculty and, in 1990, she became the first Annie W. Goodrich Professor of Nursing at Yale University.

 

Virginia Henderson and Dean Donna Diers at the 50th Anniversary of Yale School of Nursing, 1973

 

First Class in the Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing (GEPN) Program, 1974

 

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